Pumpkin Buckwheat Porridge Power Bowl

Love oatmeal but want to switch it up? This pumpkin buckwheat porridge power bowl is low in fat, high in fiber, and makes for a hearty breakfast that’s full of fall flavors. Vegan and gluten-free.

Despite what it’s name would lead you to believe, buckwheat doesn’t contain any wheat and it’s actually not even a real grain. It’s a pseudograin (the same as quinoa), so it’s naturally wheat and gluten free. It’s also higher in protein than wheat, corn, rice and millet!

Buckwheat Pumpkin Power Bowl topped with chia seeds, dried cranberries, apples and pecans served in a light blue bowl on white dish towel - cup of coffee in background.

I recently went through our pantry and found that I had stock-piled a ton of bulk bin items, one of which was buckwheat groats. I posted about it on Instagram and apparently I’m not the only food hoarder out there. That made me feel a tiny bit better, but I still think my collection is a bit ridiculous, so I’m on a mission to use them all up before buying any more.

Not really sure what I was going to do with the buckwheat, I decided to soak and sprout them. I’ve only tried sprouting a few times, but it really isn’t hard and it was so fun to watch the little sprouts form. <— Maybe I’m just crazy but I love watching stuff grow, sprout, etc. It’s like magic!

sprouted buckwheat in measuring cup

You do have to have a little patience because it does take a couple days to get your sprouts. Usually I’m the most inpatient person I know, but the sprouting worked to my advantage because by the time the groats had finished soaking/sprouting I had come up with a recipe idea.

I used sprouted buckwheat groats in the recipe because I had the extra time and there are many benefits of sprouting. If you want to sprout yours, here’s a great guide I found.

That said, if you don’t have the time for sprouting, just be sure you soak and rinse the buckwheat groats as it makes them easier to digest and the nutrients more readily absorbed in your body. After soaking, the groats may be a little slimy, that’s perfectly normal, just rinse them and use according to the recipe.

Buckwheat Pumpkin Power Bowl topped with chia seeds, dried cranberries, apples and pecans served in a light blue bowl on white dish towel.

So for this buckwheat power bowl, I cooked it up the same way I cook stove top oats. I used unsweetened vanilla almond milk and banana slices for a hint of sweetness and then added the canned pumpkin and pumpkin spice seasoning for a little taste of fall. The buckwheat gives the bowl a distinct nutty flavor and a lovely boost of volume and creaminess.

Buckwheat Pumpkin Power Bowl topped with chia seeds, dried cranberries, apples and pecans served in a light blue bowl on white dish towel.

To give it a powerful nutrient boost (and make it pretty), I topped the bowl with chia seeds, dried apple slices, cranberries and pecans.

Overhead shot of Buckwheat Pumpkin Power Bowl topped with chia seeds, dried cranberries, apples and pecans served in a light blue bowl on white dish towel.

Time to dig in!

Buckwheat Pumpkin Power Bowl topped with chia seeds, dried cranberries, apples and pecans served in a light blue bowl on white dish towel.

I think this bowl is perfectly sweet on it’s own, especially with a little dried fruit on top, but feel free to sprinkle on a little coconut sugar or a drizzle of maple syrup if you need it to be sweeter. I enjoyed the first serving warm, well semi-warm since I had to take photos of it (blogger problems!). I ate the second serving for breakfast this morning cold, straight from the fridge like overnight oats. It was delicious both ways!

If you make this pumpkin buckwheat porridge power bowl, please be sure to leave a comment and star rating below. Your feedback is super helpful for the EBF team and other readers who are thinking about making the recipe. 

Print

Pumpkin Buckwheat Porridge Power Bowl


  • Author: Brittany Mullins
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 minutes
  • Total Time: 15 minutes
  • Yield: 2 bowls

Description

Love oatmeal but want to switch it up? This pumpkin buckwheat porridge power bowl is low in fat, high in fiber, and makes for a hearty breakfast that’s full of fall flavors. Vegan and gluten-free.


Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup soaked or sprouted buckwheat groats
  • enough unsweetened almond milk to cover the groats (about 1 cup)
  • 1 ripe banana, sliced
  • 1/2 cup canned pumpkin
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/2 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
  • sprinkle of extra cinnamon
  • chia seeds, dried fruit and nuts for topping

Instructions

  1. Place sprouted (or soaked and rinsed) buckwheat groats in a pot with enough almond milk to cover the groats. Add banana slices and cook over medium heat until the buckwheat has absorbed the liquid and become soft. The timing will differ depending on how long you soaked the groats. My groats cooked up in about 7 minutes or so. If ever the buckwheat is getting dry, at a bit more almond milk.
  2. Stir in canned pumpkin, vanilla, pumpkin pie spice and cinnamon. Cook until the texture is to your liking.
  3. Divide into two bowls, sprinkle on toppings and enjoy!

Notes

If you’re new to buckwheat groats, look for the raw version, not the toasted version which is often called kasha. You’ll likely find it at your local health food store in the bulk bin section or on the grain aisle.

  • Category: Breakfast
  • Method: Stove Top
  • Cuisine: American

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 bowl without toppings
  • Calories: 245
  • Sugar: 10g
  • Fat: 3g
  • Carbohydrates: 50g
  • Fiber: 9g
  • Protein: 7g

PS — It’s getting chilly here which means pumpkin time is officially here. I plan to do a round-up with all my favorite pumpkin recipes soon. Get excited. 🙂

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    17 comments
  1. This was my first time making buckwheat and it won’t be the last. Thanks for sharing the recipe. It was delicious!

  2. Another great pumpkin + buckwheat recipe and very well said explanation about buckwheat! It’s true that sprouted buckwheat is healthier than ordinary buckwheat. Thanks for this recipe Brittany!

  3. Hello. I too bulk bought (roasted) buckwheat and have experienced an unpleasant “plastic” taste when I’ve soaked the kernels.

    How can I avoid this as do not want to waste the stock pile… Thanks Tanja

    • Oh no! Plastic tasting is no good. Unfortunately I don’t have a lot of experience with kasha (roasted buckwheat) so I’m not sure why it would taste that way. I just tried googling it to find an answer for you and didn’t turn up much results. Hopefully you can figure it out and enjoy the rest of you kasha. 🙂

  4. Holy porridge, this looks SO good ! I don’t even like buckwheat and this has got me dreaming of a bowl:) I made some rye flakes this morning soaked overnight with almond milk and mulberries though- it was such a nice change from the oats I normally have. I just love fall! So many porridge possibilities:) Can’t wait to see how you use up all your buckwheat:) I’ve got a similar hoarding problem with millet, wild rice, and oats right now:)

Subscribe + get eating!

Grab your Free 3 Day Clean Eating Meal Plan

Subscribe to our list and get your free printable PDF of the 3 Day Clean Eating Meal Plan and Shopping List!